Feedback

Vas kaj moti? Imate predlog? Brez zadržkov podelite svoje mnenje za nami. P.S.: Če želiš povratno informacijo, prosimo pripiši svoj email in z veseljem bomo odgovorili! Hvala z pomoč.

We detect, that you are not from Slovenia. Switch to english version here.
close

Payment > Refunds (refunding your buyers)

  1. Accepting returns and giving refunds (the law)
  2. How to refund your buyer
  3. Communicating with buyers

According to our Returns and refund policy every Dealstocker seller must offer one. This policy helps built trust between sellers and buyers. Know, that the very small percentages of items are actually returned.

 

If you are not able to concur with this principle, you should not be selling on Dealstocker. Read our Returns and refund policy carefully.

 

Accepting returns and giving refunds (the law)

 

  • You must offer a full refund if an item’s faulty, not as described or doesn’t do what it’s supposed to.
  • You must offer a refund to buyers if they cancel goods within 7 calendar days of receiving them even if they are not faulty.
  • You must then refund the customer within 30 days. They don’t have to provide a reason for cancelling.
  • You must state who pays for returning goods. According to our refund and return policy Seller pays post charges if the buyer is able to prove, that the reasons for returning the item are justified and via versa.

 

Buyer’s justified return reasons:

  • Item received by the buyer was different from what was described in the listing (color, size, specifications, condition…) e.g. the item does not match the description. By law everything that is said about the product must not be misleading - whether this is said by a sales assistant, or written on the packaging, in-store, on advertising materials or in a catalogue.
  • Item received by the buyer was damaged, not in a good condition or not fit for purpose, (appearance and finish, freedom from minor defects (such as marks or holes), safe to use, in good working order, durability),
  • Item received by the buyer was neither new nor refurbished (but used),
  • Item was not received within the specified delivery time (but later),
  • Item was not delivered at all, although the buyer paid for this item in advanced and the payment was processed by seller.

 

You do not have to offer refund if buyer:

  • Received the product that fully corresponds to listed item description,
  • knew an item was faulty when they bought it,
  • damaged the item,
  • damaged an item by trying to repair it themselves or getting someone else to do it (though they may still have the right to a repair, replacement or partial refund),
  • no longer want the item (e.g. because it’s the wrong size or color) unless they bought it without seeing it.

 

You have to offer a refund for certain items only if they’re faulty, e.g.:

  • Personalized items and custom-made items, e.g. curtains
  • perishable items, e.g. frozen food or flowers,
  • newspapers and magazines
  • CDs, DVDS and computer software they’ve unwrapped

 

Customers have exactly the same rights on refunds when they buy items on sale as when they buy them at full price.

 

Repairs and replacements

  • If a buyer has ‘accepted’ an item, but later discovers a fault, you may have to repair or replace it. The customer can still reject the item after it’s been repaired or replaced.
  • A customer has accepted an item if they’ve:
    • told you they’ve accepted it (having had enough opportunity to inspect the item before confirming they’ve received it),
    • altered the item in any way.

 

  •  You’ll have to agree to a repair or replacement if a customer returns an item within 6 months - unless you can prove it wasn’t faulty when they bought it.
  • You (business) may require customers to prove the item was faulty when they bought it if they ask for a repair or replacement after 6 months of purchase.

 

Proof of purchase

You can ask the customer for proof that they bought the item from you. This could be a sales receipt or other evidence such as a bank statement or packaging.

 

Items returned by someone other than the buyer

You only have to accept returns from the person who bought the item.

 

Penalties for displaying notices

It’s illegal to display any notice that deliberately misleads consumers or deceives them about their rights - for example, a sign that says you don’t accept returns or offer refunds.

 

Related topics: Returns and refunds policy • Delivery policy • Payment policy • Privacy policy • Terms and conditions

To read more about accepting returns and giving refunds please visit https://www.gov.uk/accepting-returns-and-giving-refunds

 

How to refund your buyer

 

Your refund issue will most probably depend on the type of refund to which the buyer refers and/or possible individual agreement between you and your buyer.

 

To carry out the refund:

 

1. Contact your buyer (via email, telephone or otherwise).

2. Discuss the matter and prove the problem.

If you are considering asking your buyer to prove that an item was faulty when he bought it from you, it is important to consider what proof an impartial person in a court might feel was required. For example, someone in a court might accept that a simple customer statement saying that their item did not work correctly would be sufficient proof.

 

3. Ask the buyer to prove, that the items were purchased from you.

If a buyer returns an item and complains, you are entitled to check that the item was bought from you and on the date claimed. It is the buyer’s responsibility to prove that the item was purchased from you. A sales receipt or an invoice is a good way of checking; if the customer has lost their receipt but is able to offer other evidence, for example, a bank or credit card statement, packaging etc. then you must accept this if it demonstrates the goods were purchased from you. Although sales receipts are not legally required, you should ensure you provide them for customers as a safeguard for both sides, should there be a complaint.

 

4. Ask the buyer to prove, that he purchased the item from you and not someone else

In the case of faulty items the person wishing to return the item is not the person who bought the item from you originally. This is because they may have received the item as a gift, or they may be returning the item on behalf of a member of their family or a friend. This means that someone who receives an item as a gift does not legally have the same rights as the customer, except in limited circumstances. Legally you only have to accept returns from the person who bought the item. However, most retailers will deal with someone returning faulty goods they received as a gift as an act of goodwill.

 

5. Ask the buyer to prove the goods were faulty when they bought them from you.

Faulty goods were not accepted

If the item does not conform to contract (is faulty) for any of the reasons mentioned previously, and the customer has not accepted the goods, the law says the customer is entitled to:

 

  • reject the goods and claim a full refund, or
  • request a repair or replacement if that is the customer's preferred option.

 

Faulty goods that have been accepted

If the item does not conform to contract (is faulty ) for any of the reasons outlined and the customer has accepted the goods, the law says the customer is entitled to claim a repair or replacement of the goods in the first instance.

 

6. Determine the type of refund (Full refund, replacement, repair, consumer credit)

Full refund (items were not accepted)

Buyer is entitled to a full refund if he is able to prove that the items were faulty when they bought them from you and were not accepted by the buyer. He can:

 

  • reject the goods and claim a full refund, or
  • request a repair or replacement if that is the customer's preferred option.

 

Full refund = purchase price (price that was published by you in the listing and buyer paid) + post charges (if you are responsible)

 

As the retailer, you can offer a repair, a replacement or a credit note, but you cannot insist on any one of these. It is the buyer’s right to receive a full refund in these circumstances.

 

Requesting a repair or replacement

 

Buyer is entitled to a full refund (items were not accepted)

Where a buyer is entitled to a full refund because they have not accepted the goods but have agreed that you may repair or replace the goods, they can still claim a full refund if the repair or replacement is:

 

    • taking an unreasonable time, or
    • causing an unreasonable inconvenience, or
    • if the repair or replacement is not satisfactory when they receive it.

 

Buyer accepted the goods

Buyer is entitled to claim a repair or replacement of the goods in the first instance. If a buyer has accepted the goods and is requesting a repair or replacement because the goods are faulty, the onus on who is required to prove the problem depends on how long ago they purchased the item:

 

    • Under 6 moths: the customer does not have to prove the item was faulty when they bought it from you. If you disagree it is up to you, the retailer, to prove the item did conform to contract (or that the fault did not exist) at the time of sale.
    • Over 6 months: you are entitled to ask the customer to prove the item was faulty when they bought it from you. If they are able to do this they are entitled to a repair or replacement.

 

 

Price reduction

Where a buyer is entitled to repair or replacement because he accepted the goods and chose to keep them, he can claim price reduction to compensate for the fault in the goods. This would be the difference between the value of the product in perfect condition and the value of the product in the faulty condition. He can do so if the repair or replacement is:

 

    • taking an unreasonable time, or
    • causing an unreasonable inconvenience, or
    • if the repair or replacement is not satisfactory when they receive it.

 

Partial refund

Where buyer is entitled to repairorreplacement because he accepted the goods and chose to return the goods, he can claim partial refund, calculated to reflect the benefit the buyer has received from the product. He can do so if the repair or replacement is:

 

    • taking an unreasonable time, or
    • causing an unreasonable inconvenience, or
    • if the repair or replacement is not satisfactory when they receive it.

 

7. Refund or replace the item

The following points provide a brief overview of the law relating to how refunds can be given.

 

Credit note

 

You can make the full or partial refund by issuing a credit note to a buyer in the amount of the item he returned or rejected. The seller usually issues a credit note for the same or lower amount than the invoice, and then repays the money to the buyer or sets it off against a balance due from other transactions. You can offer this option, but you cannot insist. Customers do not have to accept a credit note instead of a full refund, repair or replacement if the item is faulty. You can offer credit notes as a gesture of goodwill, for example if an item is not faulty but the customer changes their mind about keeping it. In this situation your customer does not have a legal right to a refund, compensation, repair or replacement, but you may want to offer a credit note to keep them happy.

 

 

Credit card

You can insist that the refund is to the credit card used for the payment. This is because the credit card company paid you originally, and therefore you are entitled to refund them, not the customer directly.

 

Bank account

You can offer to make the refund to the buyers bank account used to make the purchase.

 

Debit card

You can offer to make the refund to the debit card used to make the purchase. Alternative methods of refund, for example cheque or cash, can be offered and may be requested by the buyer.

 

By cash

Refund your buyer by cash. We advise you not to refund by cash, since this transactions are not traceable and transparent.

 

 

Related topics: Returns and refunds policy • Delivery policy • Payment policy • Privacy policy • Terms and conditions

To read more about accepting returns and giving refunds please visit http://www.oft.gov.uk/business-advice/treating-customers-fairly/sogahome/sogaexplained

 

 

Communicating with buyers

Although some customers take court action, this is rare. In the vast majority of cases, the customer and retailer can reach a satisfactory solution without having to go to court. If you cannot reach a solution with a customer and you feel you need to seek advice, you may want to contact your local Trading Standards Office or your trade association (if you are a member).

 

Where this is not possible, you may wish to consider using an alternative dispute resolution procedure, or a scheme run by your trade association.

 

In order to solve a problem, one of the most important things to know is how to approach and communicate it with your buyer. Always keep in mind, that most of the problems are results of a simple misunderstanding that can, however, grow in to a major dispute, if not handled correctly. Here are some useful tips on how to get into it.

 

Be calm

Give your buyer a chance to explain the problem. Moderate the conversation, should your buyer start aggressively.

 

Be understanding

Make your buyer feel, that you sympathize with him and that you understand his situation. Also make it very clear, that you think this situation is resolvable and that probably neither acted with bad intentions. Explain to him, that these things happen and are almost always resolvable.

 

Get to the point

After the ice is broken it is time to define the problem. Discuss the problem in detail. Focus only on the problem and not the buyer himself and try to ignore the attitude, might the buyer get upset during your conversation. Do not ever try to insult or get in an argument with your buyer, since this will almost certainly end in dispute.

 

Propose possible solutions

If this is a standard case, you might already have a solution. Present it to the buyer and try to close the matter. If you don’t see the solution yet, ask your buyer to give you some time to work it out. It is always better to think and rethink your options before acting.

 

Be flexible

If during your conversation you should find out, you made a mistake or it was just a lapses, admit your mistake, apologize and propose a solution. If you cannot agree on who is responsible for the situation, propose a solution from which you will both get what you are looking for.

 

Close the case

If you successfully resolved the issue, close the case and try to learn something from it. It doesn’t matter whose fault it was.

 

Act by the law

If you still cannot find the solution, you must act according to laws and policies that apply. Refer to our Policies, Terms and conditions, Rules and sale of goods act (distance selling regulations)

 

Contact us

Contact us or turn for professional help and legal advice.

 

Avoid problems if possible

The best way to avoid problems and conflicts is to do everything by the book. You can prevent most of it by creating transparent listings of your deals according to our recommendations.

 

 

Related topics: Returns and refunds policy • Delivery policy • Communicating with buyers • Selling rules • Payment policy • Listing policy • Closing the deal • Payment obligation • Privacy policy • Terms and conditions

Contact Us

Chat With Us

Start live chat.

Live Chat is availible 7 days a week, 24 hours a day. If we do not reply immediately, we will do so in 1 or 2 working days.

Email Us

support@dealstocker.com

We will reply within 2 working days.